lensblr-network
lensblr-network:

narabeanphotography.tumblr.com
My name is Nara, I am New Zealand based photographer, I started taking photos in my teens, and since then my passion for it has only grown as I learnt more about it.
I use a basic 50mm lens on a canon 5d mark II because I love the maneuverability it offers and the shallow DOF.
I mainly shoot on location emotive portraits, which tends to be on the melancholy side with subdued colours or black and white with high contrast and in the past I have used people I know as my subjects though in the future I plan to shoot with different subjects.
I truly love photography and my sincere hope is to inspire people and express myself with my work.

lensblr-network:

My name is Nara, I am New Zealand based photographer, I started taking photos in my teens, and since then my passion for it has only grown as I learnt more about it.

I use a basic 50mm lens on a canon 5d mark II because I love the maneuverability it offers and the shallow DOF.

I mainly shoot on location emotive portraits, which tends to be on the melancholy side with subdued colours or black and white with high contrast and in the past I have used people I know as my subjects though in the future I plan to shoot with different subjects.

I truly love photography and my sincere hope is to inspire people and express myself with my work.

leslieseuffert

leslieseuffert:

Jakob Wagner

"In this series entitled Sightseeing Tunnel, German photographer Jakob Wagner takes us on a colorful journey through the Bund Sightseeing Tunnel in Shanghai, China. In the popular tourist attraction, which involves a 5-minute tunnel ride in an automated car, visitors encounter surreal and otherworldly visual and audio effects. When describing the experience, Sales Director Zhang Bin says, "The story is about going from space into the core of the Earth and out again."

terrencemalicks

commanderspock:

salahmah

Chefchaouen, a small town in northern Morocco, has a rich history, beautiful natural surroundings and wonderful architecture, but what it’s most famous for are the striking and vivid blue walls of many of the buildings in its “old town” sector, or medina.

The maze-like medina sector, like those of most of the other towns in the area, features white-washed buildings with a fusion of Spanish and Moorish architecture. The brilliantly blue walls, however, seem to be unique to Chefchaouen. They are said to have been introduced to the town by Jewish refugees in 1930, who considered blue to symbolize the sky and heaven. The color caught on, and now many also believe that the blue walls serve to repel mosquitoes as well (mosquitoes dislike clear and moving water).

Whatever the reason, the town’s blue walls attract visitors who love to wander the town’s narrow streets and snap some beautiful photos.